Class 9-“Wind” by Subramania Bharati Full Analysis

Wind,Subramania Bharati,He makes strong fires roar and flourish

Class 9, Subramania Bharati’s “Wind” Summary, Explanation, Analysis, Literary Devices, Line-by-Line Explanation, Question Answers and Extract Based Questions.

Class 9-“Wind” by Subramania Bharati Full Analysis

Subramania Bharati

Subramania Bharati (1882–1921) was a prominent Indian poet, freedom fighter, and social reformer. Hailing from Tamil Nadu, he ardently advocated for social equality, women’s rights, and India’s independence from British rule. His powerful and inspiring poetry, often expressing nationalist fervour, earned him the title “Mahakavi Bharati.” His legacy endures as a symbol of progressive thought and literary excellence.

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Vocabulary:

  • Shutters: Protective covers for windows.
  • Scatter: Spread or disperse in different directions.
  • Rafters: Beams supporting the roof of a building.
  • Crumbling: Breaking or falling apart into small pieces.
  • Winnows: Separates the good from the bad, often referring to grains.
  • Steadfast: Firmly fixed or unwavering.
  • Implores: Begs or earnestly requests.
  • Poking fun at: Making jokes or mocking in a light-hearted manner.
  • Frail: Weak or delicate.
  • Endures: Persists or lasts over time.
  • Adversity: Difficulties or challenges.
  • Extinguish: Put out or quench, mainly referring to fires.

Summary “Wind” by Subramania Bharati:

In the poem ‘Wind’ by Subramania Bharati, the speaker addresses the wind with a plea for gentleness. The speaker implores the wind to come softly without causing damage to shutters, papers, or books. The wind’s actions are portrayed as destructive, tearing pages and bringing rain. 

The speaker acknowledges the wind’s cleverness in mocking the weak and describes various elements, including houses, doors, and lives, as crumbling under the wind’s force. The speaker then suggests building strong homes, securing doors, strengthening the body, and steadfastening the heart to earn the wind’s friendship. 

The poem emphasises the wind’s power to extinguish weak fires and fuel strong ones, highlighting the importance of resilience and strength. The poem reflects on the forces of nature and the importance of resilience in the face of adversity.

Explanation “Wind” Class 9 Poem:

  • The poem metaphorically explores the impact of life’s challenges and adversities, represented by the wind. The poet addresses the wind, imploring it to be gentle and not wreak havoc. The wind symbolises the unpredictable and uncontrollable forces that can disrupt our lives, akin to hardships and struggles.
  • The poet describes the wind’s destructive nature, breaking shutters, scattering papers, and tearing pages of books. This destruction is a metaphor for the disruptions and setbacks that people face in their lives. The crumbling houses, doors, and rafters represent the fragility of human existence in the face of adversity.
  • However, the poet suggests a solution. Instead of merely asking the wind to be gentle, he proposes that people build strong homes, secure doors, and strengthen their bodies and hearts. This is a metaphor for building resilience, both physically and emotionally, to withstand the challenges that life presents.
  • The poem concludes that the wind will become a friend rather than a foe if individuals practice strength and resilience. The wind, likened to challenges, has the power to extinguish weak fires (symbolising frailty) but can make strong fires roar and flourish (representing strength and determination). The poem’s message is one of resilience, self-improvement, and the ability to transform challenges into opportunities for growth.

Literary Analysis:

  1. Introduction of the Wind:
  • The poet personifies the wind, addressing it to come softly.
  • The wind is characterised as mischievous, capable of breaking shutters, scattering papers, and throwing down books.
  1. Destruction caused by the Wind:
  • The poet describes the havoc the wind wreaks, tearing pages of books and bringing rain.
  • The destructive force of the wind is emphasised, affecting not just physical structures but also literature and knowledge.
  1. Mockery towards Weaklings:
  • The wind is portrayed as mocking and poking fun at weak things, symbolising the challenges and trials faced by fragile elements in life.
  • The imagery of frail houses, doors, rafters, and bodies suggests vulnerability to external forces.
  1. Call for Building Strong Homes:
  • The poet urges building substantial homes, firmly joint doors, and strengthening the body.
  • The metaphor of physical strength extends to the heart, symbolising emotional resilience.
  1. Defiance against the Wind:
  • The poem encourages defiance against the wind’s destructive nature, emphasising the need to make the heart steadfast.
  • The poet challenges the wind’s unpredictability, suggesting that one can withstand its challenges by building strength.
  1. Positive Attributes of the Wind:
  • Acknowledges the wind’s positive aspects, such as blowing out weak fires and making intense fires flourish.
  • Contrasts the destructive force with the constructive, suggesting that the wind’s friendship can be beneficial.
  1. Practical Advice:
  • Practical advice is given to build strong homes, secure doors, and cultivate inner strength, reinforcing the idea of resilience against life’s challenges.
  1. Praising the Wind:
  • The poem concludes by praising the wind daily, acknowledging its role in testing and strengthening.
  • This can be interpreted as accepting challenges and a willingness to learn from adversity.

Tone: 

The tone of the poem is contemplative, instructive, and defiant.

  1. Contemplative Tone:
  • The poet reflects on the nature of the wind and its impact on various aspects of life, such as physical structures, literature, and human resilience.
  • There is a thoughtful examination of the destructive and constructive aspects of the wind.
  1. Instructive Tone:
  • The poet gives practical advice and instructions to counter the destructive force of the wind.
  • There’s a sense of guidance, urging the reader to build strong homes, secure doors, and cultivate inner strength.
  1. Defiant Tone:
  • There is a defiance against the destructive nature of the wind. The poet challenges the wind, asserting it won’t do what is told, and encourages resistance against its havoc.
  • The call to build strong homes and make the heart steadfast implies a refusal to succumb to external pressures.
  1. Appreciative Tone:
  • Despite the challenges the wind poses, there is an appreciation for its positive attributes, such as extinguishing and nurturing strong fires.
  • The poet acknowledges the wind’s role in testing and strengthening, suggesting a nuanced view that includes adversity and growth.

Type: 

Given its allegorical and symbolic nature, the poem can be classified as an allegorical or symbolic poem. The poem uses the wind to represent life’s challenges and adversities, making it an allegory for the complexities and dualities of human experiences. The allegorical elements in the poem contribute to its more profound layers of meaning and interpretation.

Structure:

It is a free-verse poem with a continuous structure, lacking distinct stanzas. The lines seamlessly flow from one to the next without clear breaks. The poet uses this form to convey a constant reflection on the nature of the wind and its impact, offering a cohesive and uninterrupted exploration of the theme throughout the poem.

Theme “Wind” by Subramania Bharati: 

Resilience in the Face of Adversity:  The theme revolves around resilience and strength in facing challenges. The wind is portrayed as a force that can be destructive, breaking shutters, scattering papers, and tearing pages of books. It mocks the weak and crumbles everything in its path. 

However, the poet suggests a solution – building strong homes, firming the body, and making the heart steadfast. The poem advocates for resilience, encouraging individuals to withstand life’s challenges, much like a strong fire that the wind cannot extinguish. Ultimately, it highlights the power of human determination to overcome adversity.

Symbolism:

  1. Wind: Symbolizes the forces of change, challenges, and disruptions in life. It represents both the destructive and transformative aspects of nature.
  1. Shutters of the windows: Symbolize the protective barriers or boundaries that individuals build to shield themselves from external influences or challenges. The wind’s impact on the shutters reflects the inevitability of change and its ability to penetrate even the most guarded spaces.
  1. Rain: Symbolizes cleansing and renewal. The wind’s ability to bring rain signifies the rejuvenating aspect of change, hinting at the potential for growth and purification through challenges.
  1. Crumbling houses, doors, rafters, wood, bodies, lives, and hearts: Symbolize the fragility of human existence and societal structures. The wind’s actions highlight the transient nature of life and the need to fortify oneself physically and emotionally against life’s storms.
  1. Building strong homes, joint doors firmly, firming the body, making the heart steadfast: Represents the poet’s call to strengthen oneself physically, emotionally, and spiritually to face life’s challenges. It suggests resilience, self-improvement, and the importance of inner strength.
  1. Blowing out weak fires, making strong fires roar and flourish: Symbolizes the wind’s role in testing and refining individuals. Weak fires may represent feeble efforts or ambitions, while strong fires signify determination and resilience. The wind’s friendship is beneficial, as it helps strengthen resolve and purpose.

Imagery

1. “Don’t break the shutters of the windows.”

Imagery: Conveys the force of the wind threatening to break the window shutters, creating a visual image of the wind’s strength.

2. “Don’t scatter the papers.”

Imagery: This evokes the image of scattered papers flying in the wind, illustrating the chaotic nature of the wind.

3. “Don’t throw down the books on the shelf

Imagery: Depicts the wind tossing books from the shelf, suggesting a disruptive force that disorganises and destroys.

4. “There, look what you did — you threw them all down.”

Imagery: Describes the aftermath of the wind’s actions, painting a picture of the scattered and fallen objects.

5. “You tore the pages of the books.”

Imagery: Visualizes the wind tearing pages from books, emphasising its destructive power.

6. “Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters, crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives, crumbling hearts.”

Imagery: Paints images depicting the fragility and decay caused by the wind, vividly portraying destruction.

7. “the wind god winnows and crushes them all.”

Imagery: Presents the wind as a powerful force actively separating and crushing elements, reinforcing its destructive nature.

8. “The wind blows out weak fires. He makes strong fires roar and flourish.”

Imagery: Contrasts the impact of the wind on weak and robust fires, using visual imagery to convey its selective and influential nature.

To conclude, the poem explores the wind’s dual nature, symbolising life challenges. It encourages resilience, defiance against destructive forces, and the recognition of the positive aspects of adversities. The poem advocates building physical and emotional strength to withstand life’s trials.

Line-by-Line Explanation:

  1. “Wind, come softly.”
  • The poet gently invites the wind, setting a tone of anticipation.
  1. “Don’t break the shutters of the windows.”
  • Bharati requests the wind not to cause any damage to the window shutters.
  1. “Don’t scatter the papers.”
  • The poet asks the wind to refrain from scattering papers, indicating a desire for order and calmness.
  1. “Don’t throw down the books on the shelf.”
  • Bharati pleads with the wind not to disrupt the arrangement of books on the shelf.
  1. “There, look what you did — you threw them all down.”
  • The poet imagines the consequences of the wind’s disobedience, with books thrown down and disorder created.
  1. “You tore the pages of the books.”
  • The poet metaphorically attributes the damage to the wind, suggesting its potential to disrupt knowledge and wisdom.
  1. “You brought rain again.”
  • Bharati notes that the wind is associated with bringing rain, a natural phenomenon that can be destructive and life-sustaining.
  1. “You’re very clever at poking fun at weaklings.”
  • The poet anthropomorphises the wind, suggesting its ability to mock or play with vulnerable elements.
  1. “Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,”
  • Bharati lists various vulnerable structures, emphasising the destructive power of the wind.
  1. “crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives, crumbling hearts —”
  • The poet extends the metaphor to encompass physical structures and human existence, portraying the wind as a force that can dismantle lives and emotions.
  1. “the wind god winnows and crushes them all.”
  • Bharati refers to the wind as a god, emphasising its divine and powerful nature, capable of separating and crushing everything in its path.
  1. “He won’t do what you tell him.”
  • The poet acknowledges the uncontrollable nature of the wind, emphasising its independence and disregard for human commands.
  1. “So, come, let’s build strong homes,”
  • In response to the wind’s potential havoc, the poet suggests constructing sturdy homes to withstand its force.
  1. “Let’s joint the doors firmly.”
  • Bharati advises reinforcing doors to resist the impact of the wind.
  1. “Practise to firm the body.”
  • The poet recommends physical strength and resilience to withstand the challenges posed by life, similar to fortifying doors.
  1. “Make the heart steadfast.”
  • Bharati encourages developing emotional strength and resilience, comparing it to reinforcing the heart against life’s adversities.
  1. “Do this, and the wind will be friends with us.”
  • The poet suggests that humans can live in harmony with the wind by taking these precautions, turning it into an ally (friend) rather than a destructive force.
  1. “The wind blows out weak fires.”
  • Bharati uses a metaphor to illustrate that the wind extinguishes feeble endeavours or aspirations.
  1. “He makes strong fires roar and flourish.”
  • Contrasting the previous line, the poet suggests that the wind can strengthen and energise strong efforts.
  1. “His friendship is good. We praise him every day.”
  • The poem concludes with the poet appreciating the positive aspects of the wind, acknowledging its role in life and nature, and expressing gratitude for its friendship.

Literary Devices:

Question/Answers “Wind” by Subramania Bharati:

Textbook Questions

I. Q1: What does the wind do in the first stanza?

A1: In the first stanza of the poem, the wind is invited gently, and the poet requests it not to:

  • Break the shutters of the windows.
  • Scatter the papers.
  • Throw down the books on the shelf.

The poet desires the wind to behave gently and not cause any disturbance to the surroundings.

Q3: What does the poet say about the wind god winnows?

A3: The poet states that the wind god winnows and crushes:

  • Frail crumbling houses
  • Crumbling doors
  • Crumbling rafters
  • Crumbling wood
  • Crumbling bodies
  • Crumbling lives
  • Crumbling hearts

The poet uses a series of metaphors to describe the destructive power of the wind, suggesting its ability to break down physical structures and human lives and emotions.

Q4: What should we do to make friends with the wind?

A4: To make friends with the wind, as suggested by the poet in the poem, one should:

  • Build strong homes.
  • Join the doors firmly.
  • Practice to firm the body.
  • Make the heart steadfast.

By reinforcing physical structures, strengthening the body, and developing emotional resilience, humans can coexist harmoniously with the wind, turning it into an ally rather than a destructive force. The poet emphasises the importance of preparedness and resilience in the face of the wind’s power.

Q5: What do the last four lines of the poem mean to you?

A5: The last four lines suggest that the wind can distinguish and strengthen different elements of life:

  1. “The wind blows out weak fires.” The wind is seen as extinguishing weak efforts or determination.
  1. “He makes strong fires roar and flourish.” In contrast, the wind is thought to strengthen and energise (invigorate) strong efforts.
  1. “His friendship is good.” The wind’s influence can be positive and beneficial despite its unpredictable nature.
  1. “We praise him every day.” The poet expresses gratitude and acknowledgement for the wind, recognising its role in the natural order and implying that the wind’s challenges and adversities contribute to growth and strength.

Q6: How does the poet speak to the wind — in anger or with humour? You must also have seen or heard of the wind “crumbling lives”. What is your response to this? Is it like the poet’s?

A6: The poet speaks to the wind with frustration and a touch of humour. There’s a sense of irritation when the poet scolds the wind for disruptive actions, like breaking shutters and tearing pages. However, the poet also personifies the wind with a humorous tone, accusing it of being clever at poking fun at weaklings.

Regarding the wind’s “crumbling lives,” the poet’s portrayal of the wind affecting physical structures and human existence highlights recognising the wind’s potential to bring about significant harm and upheaval in people’s lives.

As a neutral observer, I would respond to the poet’s symbolic description of the impact of wind on lives. The poet expresses how external forces, like the wind, can profoundly and violently affect individuals and communities. The poet’s frustration and call to build resilience and grit resonate with people because everyone faces challenges and adversity.

Extra Questions: 

Q1: What is the poet asking the wind to do in the poem’s first few lines?

A1: The poet asks the wind to come softly and not to break the windows shutters, scatter papers, or throw down books on the shelf.

Q2: What has the wind done according to the poet, and how does the poet describe the consequences?

A2: The wind, according to the poet, has thrown down the books, torn the pages of the books, and brought rain. The consequences are described as the destruction of frail houses, doors, rafters, wood, bodies, lives, and hearts.

Q3: How does the poet characterise the wind god in the poem?

A3: The poet characterises the wind god as clever at poking fun at weaklings. The wind god winnows and crushes frail and crumbling things, refusing to obey human commands.

Q4: What does the poet suggest as a solution to the destructive nature of the wind?

A4: The poet suggests building strong homes, firmly joining doors, practising to make the body strong, and steadfastly strengthening the heart as a solution to the destructive nature of the wind.

Q5: How does the poet describe the wind’s effect on fires?

A5: The poet mentions that the wind blows out weak fires but makes strong fires roar and flourish. The wind’s friendship with strong fires is considered good, and the poet praises the wind for it.

Q6: What is the central idea of the poem ‘Wind’ by Subramania Bharati? 

A6: The central idea of the poem revolves around life’s destructive yet natural forces and the necessity for resilience in the face of adversity. The poem metaphorically portrays the wind as a powerful and uncontrollable force that disrupts order, scattering papers, tearing books, and bringing rain. 

Through vivid imagery, Bharati emphasises the fragility of human existence, the vulnerability of societal structures, and the indifferent nature of external challenges. However, amidst this portrayal of destruction, the poet suggests a solution—building strong homes, firming doors, and fortifying the body and heart. 

The poem, thus, conveys a message of resilience, urging individuals and communities to strengthen themselves to face life’s inevitable trials.

Q7: What metaphorical significance does the poet attribute to the wind’s actions on doors, books, and lives?

A7: The poet metaphorically depicts the wind as disrupting order and stability. The scattered papers, torn pages, and thrown-down books symbolise intellectual chaos, while the destruction of doors and houses represents societal disintegration. 

The poet extends the metaphor to encompass the fragility of human existence, portraying the wind god as indifferent to human commands. The call to build strong homes and firm doors suggests a metaphorical fortification against life’s challenges. 

Thus, the poet employs vivid imagery to convey the wind’s symbolic role in both the physical and metaphorical realms, emphasising the need for resilience in facing life’s adversities.

Q8: How does Subramania Bharati explore the wind’s selective impact on fires and its broader implications for strength and resilience?

A8: Bharati skillfully employs the wind’s interaction with fires as a metaphor for life’s challenges. The poet contrasts the wind’s extinguishing effect on weak fires with its ability to make strong fires roar and flourish. 

This metaphor extends beyond literal fires, symbolising the varying impacts of adversity on individuals. The wind’s friendship with strong fires becomes a poignant analogy for resilience, emphasising that challenges can extinguish feeble spirits or ignite the flame of determination. 

Bharati’s nuanced exploration highlights the importance of inner strength and steadfastness in the face of life’s unpredictable winds, encouraging the cultivation of enduring qualities to withstand adversity.

Q9: Explore the poet’s call to “joint the doors firmly” and its broader implications for societal and personal resilience in adversity.

A9: Bharati’s urging to “joint the doors firmly” extends beyond mere physical reinforcement, carrying profound implications for societal and personal resilience. The poet suggests a collective effort to strengthen the foundations of homes and communities, emphasising the need for unity and mutual support in facing external challenges. 

This call also resonates personally, advocating for individual fortitude to navigate life’s uncertainties. By reinforcing doors, symbolic of barriers and boundaries, the poet conveys the importance of establishing resilient structures that withstand the metaphorical winds of change. Thus, the call for jointing doors becomes a symbolic guide for building resilience both on a societal and individual level.

Extract-Based Questions “Wind” by Subramania Bharati:

Extract 1

“Wind, come softly.

Don’t break the shutters of the windows.

Don’t scatter the papers.

Don’t throw down the books on the shelf.

There, look what you did — you threw them all down.

You tore the pages of the books.

You brought rain again.”

Q1: What is the poet’s initial request to the wind in the opening lines?

A1: The poet initially requests the wind to come softly without causing damage.

Q2: What specific actions does the poet instruct the wind not to do?

A2: The poet instructs the wind not to break the windows shutters, not scatter the papers, and not throw down the books on the shelf.

Q3: What consequence does the poet attribute to the wind’s actions, as mentioned in the lines “There, look what you did — you threw them all down”?

A3: The consequence of the wind’s actions is the throwing down books, tearing pages, and creating disorder.

Q4: How does the poet express dissatisfaction with the wind’s behaviour?

A4: The poet expresses dissatisfaction by directly addressing the wind and pointing out the negative consequences of its actions, such as throwing down books and tearing pages.

Q5: What is the additional impact mentioned by the poet regarding the wind’s actions?

A5: The poet mentions that the wind brought rain again, indicating an additional consequence of the wind’s disruptive behaviour.


Extract 2

“You’re very clever at poking fun at weaklings.

Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,

crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,

crumbling hearts —

the wind god winnows and crushes them all.”

Q1: What quality does the poet attribute to the wind in the first line of the extract?

A1: The poet attributes cleverness to the wind, suggesting that it is adept at mocking or making fun of weak entities.

Q2: According to the extract, what are the various things the wind god crushes and winnows?

A2: The wind god crushes and winnows frail, crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters, crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives, and crumbling hearts.

Q3: What is the significance of the term “winnows” in the context of the poem?

A3: In the poem’s context, “winnows” implies separating or sifting through, suggesting that the wind god not only crushes but also sifts through the weakened elements, magnifying their fragility.

Q4: How does the poet emphasise the pervasive impact of the wind god’s actions on different aspects of existence?

A4: The poet uses a series of repetitions, listing various elements such as houses, doors, rafters, wood, bodies, lives, and hearts, to highlight the pervasive impact of the wind god’s actions on diverse aspects of existence.

Q5: What does the poet convey about the vulnerability of the things mentioned in the extract?

A5: The poet conveys that the things mentioned in the extract, including houses, doors, rafters, wood, bodies, lives, and hearts, are vulnerable to the destructive power of the wind god, emphasising their fragility and susceptibility to external forces.


Extract 3

“He won’t do what you tell him.

So, come, let’s build strong homes,

Let’s joint the doors firmly.

Practise to firm the body.

Make the heart steadfast.”

Q1: Why does the poet claim that the wind won’t obey human commands?

A1: The poet suggests the wind’s refusal to obey human commands, emphasising its uncontrollable and indifferent nature.

Q2: What does the poet propose to respond to the wind’s destructive tendencies?

A2: The poet proposes building strong homes, firmly joining doors, practising to strengthen the body, and making the heart steadfast as a response to the wind’s destructive tendencies.

Q3: What is the implied consequence if one fails to take the suggested actions?

A3: The implied consequence is the continued vulnerability to the wind’s destructive actions, leading to the potential scattering of papers, tearing of books, and other disruptions.

Q4: What does the poet mean by “joint the doors firmly”, and what is its significance?

A4: “Joint the doors firmly” refers to reinforcing the barriers and boundaries in one’s life. It signifies the need to create solid and resilient structures to withstand external challenges.

Q5: What broader message does the poet convey through the lines “Practise to firm the body. Make the heart steadfast”?

A5: The poet encourages personal resilience by urging individuals to practice strengthening their physical and emotional selves. The message is to prepare and fortify oneself for life’s challenges.


Extract 4

“Do this, and the wind will be friends with us.

The wind blows out weak fires.

He makes strong fires roar and flourish.

His friendship is good.

We praise him every day.”

Q1: What does the poet suggest as a condition for the wind to be friendly?

A1: The poet suggests building strong homes, joining doors firmly, practising to firm the body, and making the heart steadfast as conditions for the wind to be friendly.

Q2: What symbolic significance does the wind blowing out weak fires hold in the context of the poem?

A2: The wind blowing out weak fires is a metaphor for life’s challenges extinguishing feeble spirits or endeavours, emphasising the importance of inner strength and resilience.

Q3: How does the poet characterise the wind’s impact on strong fires?

A3: The poet describes the wind as making strong fires roar and flourish, symbolising its ability to ignite determination and resilience in the face of adversity.

Q4: What positive quality does the poet ascribe (explain or clarify) to the wind’s friendship?

A4: The poet views the wind’s friendship as good, particularly in its ability to strengthen and invigorate strong fires and, metaphorically, resilient individuals.

Q5: In what way does the poet express appreciation for the wind in the concluding lines?

A5: The poet expresses appreciation by stating, “We praise him every day,” highlighting a recognition of the wind’s role in fostering strength and resilience when faced with life’s challenges.


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