Class 11- Complete We’re Not Afraid to Die MCQs

We're Not Afraid to Die MCQs,We're Not afraid to die if we can all be together

Solve Chapter 2, We’re Not Afraid to Die MCQs. Explore questions, expressions, similes, and metaphors used by the author to vividly portray the challenges faced by the characters amidst a sinking ship. These engaging MCQs will challenge your understanding of descriptive language and narrative context.

Next: Poem “The Laburnum Top” by Ted Hughes

Chapter 2- We’re Not Afraid to Die MCQs:

“We’re Not Afraid to Die…if We Can All Be Together” by Gordon Cook and Alan East recounts a harrowing experience of Gordon Cook and his family as they sail across treacherous waters, facing monstrous waves and a near-fatal disaster. The following MCQs are based on the narrative that highlights their resilience and determination in the face of adversity.

We're Not Afraid to Die MCQs,We're Not afraid to die if we can all be together

A picture of Suzanne, Mary and Jonathan with crew aboard Wavewalker. The whole journey lasted for 10 years.

Please try the questions before and then tally the answers below.

Set I

1. What was the primary reason for the family’s voyage?

a) To explore uncharted territories.

b) To replicate Captain James Cook’s round-the-world voyage.

c) To conduct scientific research.

d) To participate in a sailing competition.

2. What was the name of the family’s boat?

a) Sea Explorer.

b) Wavewalker.

c) Ocean Voyager.

d) Captain’s Dream.

3. Where did the family set sail from?

a) Sydney, Australia.

b) Plymouth, England.

c) Cape Town, South Africa.

d) New York, USA.

4. How old was the son, Jonathan, at the beginning of the voyage?

a) 6

b) 7

c) 8

d) 9

5. How long was the planned duration of the family’s journey?

a) 1 year

b) 2 years

c) 3 years

d) 4 years

6. Who joined the family as crew members after they reached Cape Town?

a) Larry Vigil and Herb Seigler.

b) James Cook and Mary Seacole.

c) John Smith and Anne Bonny.

d) Christopher Columbus and Ferdinand Magellan.

7. What was the primary concern regarding the weather during the voyage?

a) Lack of wind.

b) Heavy rain.

c) Strong gales and gigantic waves.

d) Extreme heat.

8. How did the family slow the boat in the face of the storm?

a) Raised more sails.

b) Deployed parachutes.

c) Dropped the storm jib and lashed a heavy mooring rope across the stern.

d) Increased engine speed.

9. When did the family celebrate Christmas during the voyage?

a) December 24

b) December 25

c) December 26

d) December 27

10. What happened on New Year’s Day?

a) The weather improved.

b) They encountered a tropical paradise.

c) They encountered a new crew.

d) The weather remained bad.

11. What was the first indication of impending disaster on January 2?

a) Heavy rain.

b) Ominous silence and a darkening sky.

c) A sudden drop in temperature.

d) Clear blue skies.

12. What did the narrator initially mistake the enormous wave for?

a) A cloud.

b) A mirage.

c) Another boat.

d) An iceberg.

13. How did the narrator initially react to the impending disaster?

a) He panicked.

b) He felt peaceful.

c) He started praying.

d) He tried to call for help.

14. What happened to the narrator when the wave hit the ship?

a) He was thrown overboard.

b) He was knocked unconscious.

c) He remained at the helm.

d) He jumped into the lifeboat.

15. What injury did the narrator sustain during the ordeal?

a) Broken ribs and teeth.

b) Sprained ankle.

c) Concussion.

d) Broken arm.

16. What did the narrator use to line up the stern of the boat for the next wave?

a) The compass.

b) The radar.

c) The sextant.

d) The wheel.

17. What did the narrator grab onto to prevent himself from being swept away?

a) The mast.

b) The guard rails.

c) The life raft.

d) The anchor.

18. How did the narrator describe his experience of being tossed around the deck?

a) Like a feather in the wind.

b) Like a raging bull.

c) Like a rag doll.

d) Like a rock in a landslide.

19. What was the outcome of the wave hitting the ship?

a) The ship capsized.

b) The ship sank.

c) The ship remained afloat.

d) The ship lost its mast.

20. How did the narrator feel as he was thrown around the deck?

a) Terrified

b) Angry

c) Helpless

d) Determined

Answers: 

  1. b) To replicate Captain James Cook’s round-the-world voyage
  2. b) Wavewalker
  3. b) Plymouth, England
  4. a) 6
  5. c) 3 years
  6. a) Larry Vigil and Herb Seigler
  7. c) Strong gales and gigantic waves
  8. c) Dropped the storm jib and lashed a heavy mooring rope across the stern
  9. b) December 25
  10. d) The weather remained bad
  11. b) Ominous silence and a darkening sky
  12. a) A cloud
  13. b) He felt peaceful
  14. a) He was thrown overboard
  15. a) Broken ribs and teeth
  16. d) The wheel
  17. b) The guard rails
  18. c) Like a rag doll
  19. c) The ship remained afloat
  20. c) Helpless

Set II

1. What expression describes the rough weather encountered on January 2nd?

A) “A storm brewed on the horizon.”

B) “The sky immediately grew dark.”

C) “The wind dropped, and the sky immediately grew dark.”

D) “The waves were gigantic.”

2. What does the author compare the size of the waves to?

A) “As high as our main mast”

B) “Like a gentle breeze”

C) “As vast as the ocean itself”

D) “Twice the height of other waves, with a frightful breaking crest”

3. What metaphor is used to describe the approaching wave?

A) “A silent assassin”

B) “A towering giant”

C) “A gentle whisper”

D) “A friendly companion”

4. How does the author describe the moment the wave hits the ship?

A) “A moment of calm”

B) “A terrifying explosion”

C) “A gentle nudge”

D) “A peaceful encounter”

5. Which expression describes the author’s experience of being thrown overboard?

A) “Floating on clouds”

B) “Flying overboard”

C) “Sinking like a stone”

D) “Swimming gracefully”

6. What simile is used to describe the ship’s precarious position?

A) “Like a bird in flight”

B) “Like a leaf in the wind”

C) “Like a ship in a storm”

D) “Like a toy in the hands of a child”

7. How does the author describe their physical condition after the ordeal?

A) “Feeling rejuvenated”

B) “Battered and broken”

C) “As fit as a fiddle”

D) “Like a champion”

8. What expression conveys the author’s determination during the ordeal?

A) “Hanging on for dear life”

B) “Drifting aimlessly”

C) “Dancing in the rain”

D) “Relaxing by the fire”

9. What metaphor describes the sound of the wind and spray during the storm?

A) “A gentle melody”

B) “A symphony of chaos”

C) “A whisper in the night”

D) “A calming breeze”

10. How does the author describe the ship’s movement during the storm?

A) “Gently swaying from side to side”

B) “Riding the waves like a skilled surfer”

C) “Tossed around like a leaf in a whirlwind”

D) “Navigating smoothly through the turbulence”

11. What expression describes the author’s feeling of peace as they accept their approaching death?

A) “Heart pounding with fear”

B) “Mind racing with panic”

C) “Feeling quite peaceful”

D) “Trembling with anxiety”

12. What simile describes the author’s experience of being thrown around the deck?

A) “Like a leaf caught in a whirlwind”

B) “Like a puppet on strings”

C) “Like a fish out of water”

D) “Like a bird soaring through the sky”

13. How does the author describe the impact of the wave hitting the ship?

A) “A gentle caress”

B) “A deafening roar”

C) “A soothing embrace”

D) “A quiet whisper”

14. What expression conveys the intensity of the wave’s impact on the ship?

A) “A gentle push”

B) “A devastating blow”

C) “A soft touch”

D) “A warm embrace”

15. What simile describes the ship’s masts during the storm?

A) “Like trees swaying in the wind”

B) “Like candles in a breeze”

C) “Like towers reaching for the sky”

D) “Like rocks in a raging river”

Answers: 

  1. D) “The waves were gigantic”
  2. D) “Twice the height of other waves, with a frightful breaking crest”
  3. B) “A towering giant”
  4. B) “A terrifying explosion”
  5. B) “Flying overboard”
  6. C) “Like a ship in a storm”
  7. B) “Battered and broken”
  8. A) “Hanging on for dear life”
  9. B) “A symphony of chaos”
  10. C) “Tossed around like a leaf in a whirlwind”
  11. C) “Feeling quite peaceful”
  12. A) “Like a leaf caught in a whirlwind”
  13. B) “A deafening roar”
  14. B) “A devastating blow”
  15. C) “Like towers reaching for the sky”

Set III

1. What expression does the author use to describe the state of the ship’s decks?

A) “Smooth and orderly”

B) “Neatly arranged”

C) “Full of water with broken timbers hanging at crazy angles.”

D) “Dry and clean”

2. How does the author describe his movement when checking on the children?

A) “Strolling leisurely”

B) “Half-swam, half-crawled”

C) “Running hurriedly”

D) “Walking briskly”

3. What tool does the author use to make repairs on the ship?

A) Hammer and nails.

B) Wrench and screws.

C) Screwdriver and canvas.

D) Hammer, screws, and canvas.

4. What was one of the problems encountered with the hand pumps?

A) They were too powerful.

B) They were too heavy.

C) They became blocked with debris.

D) They malfunctioned due to electrical issues.

5. Which items were lost overboard during the ordeal?

A) Spare hand pumps and forestay sail.

B) Main anchor and dinghies.

C) Main anchor and jib.

D) Spare hand pumps and dinghies.

6. How did the author manage to fix the electric pump?

A) He replaced it with a new one.

B) He repaired it using spare parts.

C) He connected it to an out-pipe.

D) He manually pumped it to clear the blockage.

7. What prevented the crew from receiving replies to their Mayday calls?

A) The radio malfunctioned.

B) There was no one nearby to respond.

C) The crew didn’t transmit the calls correctly.

D) The calls were intercepted by another vessel.

8. What was the condition of Sue’s injuries when they were finally revealed?

A) Minor scratches.

B) Broken bones.

C) Swollen head and a deep cut on the arm.

D) No injuries at all.

9. How long had the crew continuously pumped water on January 4?

A) 24 hours

B) 36 hours

C) 48 hours

D) 15 hours

10. What did the author discover upon checking the boat’s main rib frames?

A) They were intact and sturdy.

B) They were smashed down to the keel.

C) They were reinforced with steel.

D) They were damaged but still functional.

11. Why couldn’t the crew set sail on the main mast?

A) The sails were torn.

B) The rigging was damaged.

C) The wind was too strong.

D) The crew needed to learn how to sail.

12. What was the condition of the auxiliary engine after the great wave hit?

A) It was working perfectly.

B) It was out of action.

C) It was damaged but still usable.

D) It was functioning intermittently.

13. What did the crew eat for their first meal after the wave hit?

A) Corned beef and cracker biscuits.

B) Fresh fruit and vegetables.

C) Canned soup and bread.

D) Chocolate and nuts.

14. Why was the crew’s respite short-lived after eating their first meal?

A) The crew fell asleep and didn’t wake up.

B) The weather deteriorated rapidly.

C) The food made them sick.

D) They ran out of food immediately.

15. What happened to the weather by dawn on January 5?

A) It became clear and calm.

B) It remained stable.

C) It deteriorated further.

D) It improved slightly.

16. What action did Mary take when she appeared on deck after the front hatch was thrown open?

A) She screamed for help.

B) She started repairing the broken timbers.

C) She took over the wheel from the author.

D) She alerted the crew about the sinking ship.

17. How does the author describe the condition of the starboard side of the ship?

A) Smooth and intact.

B) Bulging inward with broken timbers hanging at crazy angles.

C) Undamaged and sturdy.

D) Sinking below the waterline.

18. What did Sue mention about her condition when the author checked on her?

A) She felt dizzy.

B) She complained of nausea.

C) She pointed to a big bump above her eyes.

D) She said she was feeling cold.

19. What did the author find upon returning to the deck with the canvas and screws?

A) The ship was sinking rapidly.

B) The water level had decreased.

C) The ship was listing heavily to one side.

D) The starboard side was bashed open.

20. What was the author’s initial response upon realising the severity of the ship’s damage?

A) Panic and despair.

B) Determination to make repairs.

C) Resignation to their fate.

D) Indifference and apathy.

21. How did the crew keep pace with the incoming water on January 4?

A) By manually bailing water.

B) By using hand pumps continuously.

C) By setting up a makeshift drainage system.

D) By fixing the electric pump.

22. What was the crew’s plan upon realising the ship wouldn’t hold together long enough to reach Australia?

A) To abandon the ship immediately.

B) To head for two small islands a few hundred kilometres east.

C) To call for rescue helicopters.

D) To repair the ship and continue sailing to Australia.

23. Why did the crew hoist the storm jib despite the damaged hull?

A) To increase the ship’s speed.

B) To stabilise the ship’s movement.

C) To signal for help.

D) To test the remaining rigging.

24. After reaching the last few centimetres of water on January 4, what did the crew consume for sustenance?

A) Fresh water from the reserve tanks.

B) Emergency rations.

C) Seaweed and algae.

D) Fish caught from the ocean.

25. What action did the crew take upon encountering the worsening weather on January 4?

A) They abandoned the ship.

B) They continued pumping water.

C) They sought refuge on a nearby island.

D) They attempted to repair the main mast.

Answers:

  1. C) “Full of water with broken timbers hanging at crazy angles.”
  2. B) “Half-swam, half-crawled”
  3. D) Hammer, screws, and canvas
  4. C) They became blocked with debris
  5. A) Spare hand pumps and forestay sail
  6. C) He connected it to an out-pipe
  7. B) There was no one nearby to respond
  8. C) Swollen head and a deep cut on the arm
  9. B) 36 hours
  10. B) They were smashed down to the keel
  11. B) The rigging was damaged
  12. B) It was out of action
  13. A) Corned beef and cracker biscuits
  14. B) The weather deteriorated rapidly
  15. C) It deteriorated further
  16. D) She alerted the crew about the sinking ship
  17. B) Bulging inward with broken timbers hanging at crazy angles
  18. C) She pointed to a big bump above her eyes
  19. D) The starboard side was bashed open
  20. B) Determination to make repairs
  21. B) By using hand pumps continuously
  22. B) To head for two small islands a few hundred kilometres to the east
  23. B) To stabilise the ship’s movement
  24. A) Fresh water from the reserve tanks
  25. D) They attempted to repair the main mast

Set IV

1. What expression does the author use to describe the ship’s condition when Mary appears on deck?

A) “A moment of calm”

B) “A sinking feeling”

C) “Water, water, everywhere”

D) “A wave of panic”

2. How does the author describe the situation’s urgency when he instructs Mary to take the wheel?

A) “Take control”

B) “Steer the ship”

C) “Hold the course”

D) “Take the wheel.”

3. What simile is used to describe the actions of Larry and Herb as they pump water?

A) “Pumping like machines.”

B) “Pumping like madmen”

C) “Pumping like champions”

D) “Pumping like clockwork”

4. How does the author describe his journey to the children’s cabin?

A) “Swiftly and silently.”

B) “Half-swam, half-crawled”

C) “Ran with determination”

D) “Stumbled and fell”

5. What expression does the author use to convey the seriousness of the damage to the starboard side?

A) “A minor inconvenience”

B) “A gaping hole”

C) “A slight setback”

D) “A temporary setback”

6. What metaphor describes the routine of pumping, steering, and working the radio?

A) “A never-ending nightmare”

B) “A bitter pill to swallow”

C) “A relentless storm”

D) “A marathon of survival”

7. How does the author describe Sue’s injuries?

A) “Minor scratches”

B) “Two enormous black eyes”

C) “A few bumps and bruises”

D) “Unscathed”

8. What expression does Sue use to explain why she didn’t mention her injuries earlier?

A) “I didn’t want to worry you when you were trying to save us all.”

B) “I thought they were minor injuries.”

C) “I didn’t want to be a burden.”

D) “I was too scared to speak up.”

9. How does the author describe the state of the boat’s main rib frames?

A) “Intact and sturdy”

B) “Smashed down to the keel”

C) “Slightly damaged”

D) “In need of repair”

10. What metaphor does the author use to describe the islands they hope to reach?

A) “Havens in the storm”

B) “Oases in the desert”

C) “Pinpricks in the vast ocean”

D) “Beacons of hope”

11. How does the author describe the condition of the auxiliary engine?

A) “Fully functional”

B) “Out of action”

C) “Running smoothly”

D) “Ready for use”

12. What expression does the author use to describe the clouds building up behind them?

A) “A sunny outlook”

B) “Black clouds”

C) “A silver lining”

D) “Clear skies”

13. How does the author describe the respite they experience after reaching the last few centimetres of water?

A) “A moment of relief”

B) “A temporary reprieve”

C) “An endless struggle”

D) “A hopeless situation.”

14. What metaphor does the author use to describe the storm returning at 4 p.m.?

A) “A storm of emotions”

B) “A dark cloud looming”

C) “A ray of hope”

D) “A beacon in the night”

15. How does the author describe the weather by dawn on January 5?

A) “Sunny and clear”

B) “Desperate”

C) “Calm and serene”

D) “Deteriorating”

Answers:

  1. B) “A sinking feeling”
  2. D) “Take the wheel.”
  3. B) “Pumping like madmen”
  4. B) “Half-swam, half-crawled”
  5. B) “A gaping hole”
  6. D) “A marathon of survival”
  7. B) “Two enormous black eyes”
  8. A) “I didn’t want to worry you when you were trying to save us all.”
  9. B) “Smashed down to the keel”
  10. C) “Pinpricks in the vast ocean”
  11. B) “Out of action”
  12. B) “Black clouds”
  13. B) “A temporary reprieve”
  14. B) “A dark cloud looming”
  15. D) “Deteriorating”

Set V

1. What question did Jon ask his father when he went to comfort the children?

A) “Are we going to make it?”

B) “Why is the sea so angry?”

C) “Daddy, are we going to die?”

D) “Can we go back home?”

2. How did the author respond to Jon’s question about whether they would die?

A) He assured Jon that everything would be fine.

B) He said he didn’t know.

C) He told Jon not to worry.

D) He left the cabin without saying anything.

3. What decision did the author make to protect the weakened starboard side of the ship?

A) He decided to abandon the ship.

B) He decided to steer towards land.

C) He decided to heaveto using an improvised sea anchor.

D) He decided to increase speed to outrun the waves.

4. How did Mary and the author spend the evening as the ship took on more water?

A) They argued about what to do next.

B) They sat together, holding hands.

C) They prayed for rescue.

D) They prepared to abandon the ship.

5. What did Sue give to the author in the chartroom?

A) A bottle of water.

B) A compass.

C) A map.

D) A card she had made.

6. What was drawn on the front of Sue’s card to the author?

A) A map of the island

B) Caricatures of Mary and the author

C) A picture of the ship

D) A picture of the family

7. What did Sue write inside the card?

A) Instructions on how to navigate

B) A message of love and hope

C) A joke about their situation

D) Directions to the nearest island

8. Why did the author make calculations about their position?

A) To find out how far they were from home

B) To determine their location without a compass

C) To plan their next meal

D) To pass the time

9. What did the author realise about the spare compass they were using?

A) It was broken

B) It hadn’t been corrected for magnetic variation

C) It was pointing in the wrong direction

D) It was working perfectly

10. What direction did the author instruct Larry to steer?

A) 90 degrees

B) 185 degrees

C) 270 degrees

D) 360 degrees

11. What did the author do after instructing Larry on the course?

A) He went to sleep

B) He went to the chartroom

C) He went on deck to look for the island

D) He went to comfort the children

12. How did the author feel when he woke up and realised it was 6 p.m.?

A) Relieved

B) Anxious

C) Confused

D) Frustrated

13. What did Jon and Sue tell the author when they appeared by his bunk?

A) That they wanted to play a game

B) That they were hungry

C) That they needed a hug

D) That they saw the island

14. How did the author react when Jon and Sue told him they found the island?

A) He laughed

B) He cried

C) He shouted

D) He was surprised

15. What did the author see when he rushed on deck after Jon and Sue’s revelation?

A) Another ship

B) A storm was approaching

C) The outline of Ile Amsterdam

D) A whale

16. How did the crew of Ile Amsterdam welcome the author and his crew?

A) With hostility

B) With indifference

C) With cheers

D) With silence

17. What was the condition of Sue’s head injury?

A) Minor cut

B) Broken bone

C) Recurring blood clot

D) Bruise

18. What did the author think about as he stood on land again?

A) His lost possessions

B) The crew’s cheerful and optimistic attitude

C) The storm they survived

D) The damaged hull of the ship

19. What did the author feel most grateful for as he reflected on their ordeal?

A) The storm jib

B) The sextant

C) The sea anchor

D) The courage of his family and crew

20. What quality did Jon express about his father?

A) Anger

B) Fear

C) Gratitude

D) Disappointment

Answers:

  1. C) “Daddy, are we going to die?”
  2. A) He assured Jon that everything would be fine.
  3. C) He decided to heaveto using an improvised sea anchor.
  4. B) They sat together, holding hands.
  5. D) A card she had made
  6. B) Caricatures of Mary and the author
  7. B) A message of love and hope
  8. B) To determine their location without a compass
  9. B) It hadn’t been corrected for magnetic variation
  10. B) 185 degrees
  11. D) He went to comfort the children
  12. A) Relieved
  13. C) That they needed a hug
  14. D) He was surprised
  15. C) The outline of Ile Amsterdam
  16. C) With cheers
  17. C) Recurring blood clot
  18. B) The crew’s cheerful and optimistic attitude
  19. D) The courage of his family and crew
  20. C) Gratitude

Set VI

1. What expression does the author use to describe the children’s cabin after the wave hit?

A) “A haven of tranquillity”

B) “A room filled with fear”

C) “A place of solace and safety”

D) “A refuge amidst chaos”

2. How does the author describe the ship’s motion during the storm?

A) “Gentle and soothing”

B) “Rough and turbulent”

C) “Steady and predictable”

D) “Calm and serene”

3. What does the author compare the makeshift sea anchor to?

A) “A sturdy oak tree”

B) “A beacon of hope”

C) “A lifeline in the darkness”

D) “A barrier against the waves”

4. How does the author describe the feeling of Mary and himself as they hold hands during the storm?

A) “Joyful and carefree”

B) “Anxious and fearful”

C) “Content and relaxed”

D) “Excited and adventurous”

5. What expression does the author use to describe Sue’s injuries?

A) “Minor scratches and bruises”

B) “Aching and throbbing pain”

C) “Swollen and blackened eyes”

D) “Invisible wounds of the heart”

6. What does the author compare the ocean’s vastness to when calculating their position?

A) “A never-ending desert.”

B) “A boundless expanse”

C) “A bottomless pit”

D) “A limitless horizon”

7. How does the author describe the feeling of waking up after dozing off?

A) “Refreshed and invigorated”

B) “Restless and uneasy”

C) “Exhausted and drained”

D) “Surprised and disoriented”

8. What expression does the author use to describe the relief upon seeing the island?

A) “A wave of despair”

B) “A burst of joy”

C) “A cloud of uncertainty”

D) “A storm of emotions”

9. How does the author describe the inhabitants’ reactions upon arrival?

A) “A silent welcome”

B) “An indifferent response”

C) “A cheerless reception”

D) “A joyous celebration”

10. How does the author describe Mary’s dedication during the crucial hours?

A) “A steady hand at the wheel”

B) “A guiding light in the darkness”

C) “A pillar of strength”

D) “A beacon of hope”

11. How does the author describe his thoughts upon setting foot on land again?

A) “A flood of memories”

B) “A sense of relief”

C) “A rush of emotions”

D) “A feeling of accomplishment”

12. What expression does the author use to describe Sue’s bravery?

A) “A flicker of courage”

B) “A beacon of hope”

C) “A ray of sunshine”

D) “A glimmer of resilience”

13. How does the author describe the island’s significance to them?

A) “A paradise regained”

B) “A beacon of salvation”

C) “A refuge from the storm”

D) “A sanctuary in the sea”

14. How does the author describe the children’s innocence in facing danger?

A) “A shield of ignorance”

B) “A veil of protection”

C) “A cloak of bravery”

D) “A blanket of innocence”

15. What expression does the author use to describe the captain’s role?

A) “A helm of responsibility”

B) “A beacon of leadership”

C) “A light in the darkness”

D) “A guide through troubled waters”

16. What simile does the author use to describe the ocean’s vastness when calculating their position?

A) “Like a never-ending desert”

B) “Like a boundless expanse”

C) “Like a bottomless pit”

D) “Like a limitless horizon”

17. What simile does the author use to describe the relief upon seeing the island?

A) “As a wave of despair”

B) “As a burst of joy”

C) “As a cloud of uncertainty”

D) “As a storm of emotions”

18. What simile does the author use to describe the island’s appearance?

A) “Like a barren desert”

B) “Like a majestic mountain”

C) “Like a stark volcanic rock”

D) “Like a lush tropical paradise”

19. What metaphor does the author use to describe Sue’s bravery?

A) “A flicker of courage”

B) “A beacon of hope”

C) “A ray of sunshine”

D) “A glimmer of resilience”

20. What simile does the author use to describe the island’s appearance from afar?

A) “Like distant dreams”

B) “Like solid rocks”

C) “Like fleeting clouds”

D) “Like welcoming shores”

Answers:

  1. D) “A refuge amidst chaos”
  2. B) “Rough and turbulent”
  3. C) “A lifeline in the darkness”
  4. B) “Anxious and fearful”
  5. C) “Swollen and blackened eyes”
  6. B) “A boundless expanse”
  7. D) “Surprised and disoriented”
  8. B) “A burst of joy”
  9. D) “A joyous celebration”
  10. C) “A pillar of strength”
  11. C) “A rush of emotions”
  12. A) “A flicker of courage”
  13. B) “A beacon of salvation”
  14. D) “A blanket of innocence”
  15. A) “A helm of responsibility”
  16. B) “Like a boundless expanse”
  17. B) “As a burst of joy”
  18. C) “Like a stark volcanic rock”
  19. D) “A glimmer of resilience”
  20. A) “Like distant dreams”

*****

You may also like these

error: Content is protected !!